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Chikungunya Literature - Latest PubMed Articles

Overview of latest articles and publications on ebola in PubMed. PubMed is a service of the US National Library of Medicine that includes over 18 million citations from MEDLINE and other life science journals.


  • Chikungunya-dengue co-infection during pregnancy requiring preterm Caesarean section: first case report from Bangladesh.
    Chikungunya-dengue co-infection during pregnancy requiring preterm Caesarean section: first case report from Bangladesh. [Journal Article]Trop Doct 2017 Jan 01.:49475517747431.TDRahim MA, Zaman S, Sultana N, et al. We report the first case of chikungunya-dengue co-infection during pregnancy requiring emergency Caesarean section (CS) because of fetal distress in a Bangladeshi primigravida. Though previously unrepo...We report the first case of chikungunya-dengue co-infection during pregnancy requiring emergency Caesarean section (CS) because of fetal distress in a Bangladeshi primigravida. Though previously unreported, this situation may become increasingly common.

  • Detection of Zika virus in Aedes mosquitoes from Mexico.
    Detection of Zika virus in Aedes mosquitoes from Mexico. [Journal Article]Trans R Soc Trop Med Hyg 2017 Jul 01; 111(7):328-331.TRHuerta H, González-Roldán JF, Sánchez-Tejeda G, et al. The entomovirological surveillance system analysed here identified both Ae. aegypti and Ae. albopictus infected with ZIKV which triggered an immediate aggressive vector control campaign.Publisher Full TextWe report on the results of an entomovirological surveillance system of Aedes populations performed by the Ministry of Health of the central state of San Luis Potosí, Mexico.Indoor adult Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus pools collected at San Martín, Tamazunchale, Ciudad Valles, Metlapa, Ebano, Tamuin and Axtla during the dry season of 2016 were examined for the presence of dengue (DENV), chikungunya (CHIKV) and Zika (ZIKV) viruses using real-time PCR.Both Ae. aegypti and Ae. albopictus were found to be infected with ZIKV in the absence of confirmed symptomatic human cases.The entomovirological surveillance system analysed here identified both Ae. aegypti and Ae. albopictus infected with ZIKV which triggered an immediate aggressive vector control campaign.

  • Estimating Vector-borne Viral Infections in the Urban Setting of the 2020 Tokyo Olympics, Japan, Using Mathematical Modeling.
    Estimating Vector-borne Viral Infections in the Urban Setting of the 2020 Tokyo Olympics, Japan, Using Mathematical Modeling. [Journal Article]Tokai J Exp Clin Med 2017 Dec 20; 42(4):160-164.TJFuruya H The first domestic outbreak of dengue fever in Japan since 1945 was reported in Tokyo in 2014. Meanwhile, daily mean summer temperatures are expected to continue to rise world-wide. Such conditions are...Aggregator Full TextThe first domestic outbreak of dengue fever in Japan since 1945 was reported in Tokyo in 2014. Meanwhile, daily mean summer temperatures are expected to continue to rise world-wide. Such conditions are expected to increase the risk of an arbovirus outbreak at the 2020 Tokyo Olympic Games. To address this possibility, the present study compared estimates of the risk of infection by dengue, chikungunya, and Zika viruses in urban areas. To compare the risk of infection by arboviruses transmitted by Ae. albopictus mosquitoes, the reproduction number for each of three arboviruses was estimated under the environmental conditions associated with the 2014 dengue outbreak in Tokyo, and additionally under conditions assuming a daily mean temperature elevation of 2° C. For dengue, chikungunya, and Zika, the estimated distributions of R0 were independently fitted to gamma distributions yielding median R0 values of 1.00, 0.46, and 0.36, respectively. If the daily mean temperature were to rise from 28° C to 30° C, our model predicts increases of the median R0 of 18% for dengue, 4.3% for chikungunya, and 11.1% for Zika. Strengthening of the public health responsivity for these emerging arboviral diseases will be needed in preparation for the 2020 Olympic Games in Tokyo.

  • Efficacy of 13 Commercial Household Aerosol Insecticides Against Aedes aegypti (Diptera: Culicidae) From Morelos, Mexico.
    Efficacy of 13 Commercial Household Aerosol Insecticides Against Aedes aegypti (Diptera: Culicidae) From Morelos, Mexico. [Journal Article]J Med Entomol 2017 Dec 08.JMKuri-Morales PA, Correa-Morales F, González-Acosta C, et al. In Mexico, Aedes aegypti (L.) (Diptera: Culicidae) is the primary vector of Dengue, Zika, and Chikungunya viruses. Control programs include community participation using personal protection such as hou...Publisher Full TextIn Mexico, Aedes aegypti (L.) (Diptera: Culicidae) is the primary vector of Dengue, Zika, and Chikungunya viruses. Control programs include community participation using personal protection such as household aerosol insecticides. In both, urban or rural areas, the use of aerosol insecticides is a common practice to avoiding mosquito biting. Thus, information on the efficacy of commercial products must be available. This study reports the efficacy of 13 household aerosol insecticides against Ae. aegypti from an endemic dengue area in Mexico. To test each insecticide, six netting cages, containing 10 non-blood fed female mosquitoes each one, were placed in different locations inside a bedroom. Readings at 30 min and 24 h after exposure were recorded. No products showed 100% mortality after 30 min of exposure. Only three products killed the 100% of the individuals 24 h after exposure. Results showed a high mortality variance among insecticides. Location in the room also impacts the insecticide efficacy. Mosquitoes located inside cabinets or with behind an obstacle (preventing an accurate insecticide exposure) showed lower mortalities. Products and spraying methods could and should be improved.

  • In Silico Validation of D7 Salivary Protein-derived B- and T-cell Epitopes of Aedes aegypti as Potential Vaccine to Prevent Transmission of Flaviviruses and Togaviruses to Humans.
    In Silico Validation of D7 Salivary Protein-derived B- and T-cell Epitopes of Aedes aegypti as Potential Vaccine to Prevent Transmission of Flaviviruses and Togaviruses to Humans. [Journal Article]Bioinformation 2017; 13(11):366-375.BSankar S, Ramamurthy M, Nandagopal B, et al. Mosquito (Aedes aegyptii) salivary proteins play a crucial role in facilitating viral transmission from vector-to-host due to their role in facilitating the "blood meal" of the vector. Three main prote...Mosquito (Aedes aegyptii) salivary proteins play a crucial role in facilitating viral transmission from vector-to-host due to their role in facilitating the "blood meal" of the vector. Three main proteins, D7, aegyptin and Sialokinin play a role in this process. Using in-silico programs, we identified B- and T-cell epitopes in the mosquito salivary proteins D7 long and short form. T-cell epitopes with high affinity to the most prevalent HLA MHC class-I supertypes among different population groups was chosen. It is our postulate that these epitopes could be successful in eliciting B and T cell responses, which would decrease the vector blood meal efficiency and hence protect against host infection by certain viruses. These include causative agents like Dengue viruses, Chikungunya virus, Zika and Yellow fever viruses. These viruses are of major public health importance in several countries in the Americas, Asia and Africa. Experimental evidence exists in previously published literature showing the protective effect of antibodies to certain salivary proteins in susceptible hosts. A novel approach of immunizing humans against the vector proteins to reduce transmission of viruses is now under investigation in several laboratories. We have identified the following two B cell epitopes LAALHVTAAPLWDAKDPEQF one from D7L and the other TSEYPDRQNQIEELNKLCKN from D7S. Likewise, two T cell epitopes MTSKNELDV one from D7L and the other YILCKASAF from D7S with affinity to the predominant MHC class-I supertypes were identified towards evaluation as potential vaccine.

  • Potential impact of climate change on emerging vector-borne and other infections in the UK.
    Potential impact of climate change on emerging vector-borne and other infections in the UK. [Journal Article]Environ Health 2017 Dec 05; 16(Suppl 1):112.EHBaylis M Climate is one of several causes of disease emergence. Although half or more of infectious diseases are affected by climate it appears to be a relatively infrequent cause of human disease emergence. Cl...Publisher Full TextClimate is one of several causes of disease emergence. Although half or more of infectious diseases are affected by climate it appears to be a relatively infrequent cause of human disease emergence. Climate mostly affects diseases caused by pathogens that spend part of their lifecycle outside of the host, exposed to the environment. The most important routes of transmission of climate sensitive diseases are by arthropod (insect and tick) vectors, in water and in food. Given the sensitivity of many diseases to climate, it is very likely that at least some will respond to future climate change. In the case of vector-borne diseases this response will include spread to new areas. Several vector-borne diseases have emerged in Europe in recent years; these include vivax malaria, West Nile fever, dengue fever, Chikungunya fever, leishmaniasis, Lyme disease and tick-borne encephalitis. The vectors of these diseases are mosquitoes, sand flies and ticks. The UK has endemic mosquito species capable of transmitting malaria and probably other pathogens, and ticks that transmit Lyme disease. The UK is also threatened by invasive mosquito species known to be able to transmit West Nile, dengue, chikungunya and Zika, and sand flies that spread leishmaniasis. Warmer temperatures in the future will increase the suitability of the UK's climate for these invasive species, and increase the risk that they may spread disease. While much attention is on invasive species, it is important to recognize the threat presented by native species too. Proposed actions to reduce the future impact of emerging vector-borne diseases in the UK include insect control activity at points of entry of vehicles and certain goods, wider surveillance for mosquitoes and sand flies, research into the threat posed by native species, increased awareness of the medical profession of the threat posed by specific diseases, regular risk assessments, and increased preparedness for the occurrence of a disease emergency.

  • Full-Length Genome Sequence of a Chikungunya Virus Isolate from the 2017 Autochthonous Outbreak, Lazio Region, Italy.
    Full-Length Genome Sequence of a Chikungunya Virus Isolate from the 2017 Autochthonous Outbreak, Lazio Region, Italy. [Journal Article]Genome Announc 2017 Dec 07; 5(49)GACarletti F, Marsella P, Colavita F, et al. We report here the genome sequence of a human chikungunya virus isolate from the ongoing autochthonous outbreak in central Italy. The sequence (East-Central-South African lineage, Indian Ocean sublinea...We report here the genome sequence of a human chikungunya virus isolate from the ongoing autochthonous outbreak in central Italy. The sequence (East-Central-South African lineage, Indian Ocean sublineage), which is similar to recent sequences from Pakistan and India, shows E1 and E2 signatures of strains whose main mosquito vector is Aedes aegypti, although Aedes albopictus is the vector in Italy.

  • The immune strategies of mosquito Aedes aegypti against microbial infection.
    The immune strategies of mosquito Aedes aegypti against microbial infection. [Journal Article]Dev Comp Immunol 2017 Dec 04.DCWang YH, Chang MM, Wang XL, et al. Yellow fever mosquito Aedes aegypti transmits many devastating arthropod-borne viruses (arboviruses), such as dengue virus, yellow fever virus, Chikungunya virus, and Zika virus, which cause great conc...Publisher Full TextYellow fever mosquito Aedes aegypti transmits many devastating arthropod-borne viruses (arboviruses), such as dengue virus, yellow fever virus, Chikungunya virus, and Zika virus, which cause great concern to human health. Mosquito control is an effective method to block the spread of infectious diseases. Ae. aegypti uses its innate immune system to fight against arboviruses, parasites, and fungi. In this review, we briefly summarize the recent findings in the immune response of Ae. aegypti against arboviral and entomopathogenic infections. This review enriches our understanding of the mosquito immune system and provides evidence to support the development of novel mosquito control strategies.

  • Assessing the zoonotic potential of arboviruses of African origin.
    Assessing the zoonotic potential of arboviruses of African origin. [Journal Article, Review]Curr Opin Virol 2017 Dec 04.:74-84.COVenter M Several African arboviruses have emerged over the past decade in new regions where they caused major outbreaks in humans and/or animals including West Nile virus, Chikungunya virus and Zika virus. This...Publisher Full TextSeveral African arboviruses have emerged over the past decade in new regions where they caused major outbreaks in humans and/or animals including West Nile virus, Chikungunya virus and Zika virus. This raise questions regarding the importance of less known zoonotic arboviruses in local epidemics in Africa and their potential to emerge internationally. Syndromic surveillance in animals may serve as an early warning system to detect zoonotic arbovirus outbreaks. Rift Valley fever and Wesselsbronvirus are for example associated with abortion storms in livestock while West Nile-virus, Shuni virus and Middelburg virus causes neurological disease outbreaks in horses and other animals. Death in birds may signal Bagaza virus and Usutu virus outbreaks. This short review summarise data on less known arboviruses with zoonotic potential in Africa.

  • Novel Wolbachia-transinfected Aedes aegypti mosquitoes possess diverse fitness and vector competence phenotypes.
    Novel Wolbachia-transinfected Aedes aegypti mosquitoes possess diverse fitness and vector competence phenotypes. [Journal Article]PLoS Pathog 2017 Dec 07; 13(12):e1006751.PPFraser JE, De Bruyne JT, Iturbe-Ormaetxe I, et al. Wolbachia pipientis from Drosophila melanogaster (wMel) is an endosymbiotic bacterium that restricts transmission of human pathogenic flaviviruses and alphaviruses, including dengue, Zika, and chikungu...Publisher Full TextWolbachia pipientis from Drosophila melanogaster (wMel) is an endosymbiotic bacterium that restricts transmission of human pathogenic flaviviruses and alphaviruses, including dengue, Zika, and chikungunya viruses, when introduced into the mosquito vector Aedes aegypti. To date, wMel-infected Ae. aegypti have been released in field trials in 5 countries to evaluate the effectiveness of this strategy for disease control. Despite the success in establishing wMel-infected mosquitoes in wild populations, and the well-characterized antiviral capabilities of wMel, transinfecting different or additional Wolbachia strains into Ae. aegypti may improve disease impact, and perhaps more importantly, could provide a strategy to account for the possible evolution of resistant arboviruses. Here, we report the successful transinfection of Ae. aegypti with the Wolbachia strains wMelCS (D. melanogaster), wRi (D. simulans) and wPip (Culex quinquefasciatus) and assess the effects on Ae. aegypti fitness, cytoplasmic incompatibility, tissue tropism and pathogen blocking in a laboratory setting. The results demonstrate that wMelCS provides a similar degree of protection against dengue virus as wMel following an infectious blood meal, and significantly reduces viral RNA levels beyond that of wMel following a direct challenge with infectious virus in mosquitoes, with no additional fitness cost to the host. The protection provided by wRi is markedly weaker than that of wMelCS, consistent with previous characterisations of these lines in Drosophila, while wPip was found to substantially reduce the fitness of Ae. aegypti. Thus, we determine wMelCS as a key candidate for further testing in field-relevant fitness tests and viremic blood feeding challenges in a clinical setting to determine if it may represent an alternative Wolbachia strain with more desirable attributes than wMel for future field testing.